Why Tony Blair's next gig should be as Safety CEO

Tony Blair is an obvious choice as leader of a brand-new movement: Safety-Respect-Prosperity. He could become the "Al Gore" of workplace safety now that's he looking for a job after 10 years leading Britain. I think he's the best candidate for Safety CEO because...

1. During the Blair years, six million people were lifted above the poverty line, crime rate fell by 35 percent and Britain became one of the top performing economies in the world with one of the lowest unemployment rates in the world. Say no more re: Tony delivering the goods!

2. Tony refused to change his position on unpopular decisions such as the Iraq war. Yes, I think that was a good thing... because right or wrong, sticking with his commitment demonstrated courage and decisiveness.

3. At 54, Tony Blair can connect powerfully with fellow Baby Boomers (a generation of much buying and decision making influence), and he can connect with many cultures after running one of the world's most multicultural nations.

Am I a dreamer to hope that the Safety-Respect-Prosperity Movement could attract a leader such as Tony Blair?

Maybe but remember, 20 years ago nobody would have ever suggested that Al Gore would be leading the environmental masses to change the world in 2007!! There are even strong rumors that Mr. Gore would be a perfect candidate as the next White House resident - demonstrating the scope of the US public's respect for his moral commitment to "doing the right thing" for the environment.

So, could someone of Tony Blair's caliber and clout on the world stage be attracted to the Safety CEO position? That's up to us, the citizenry of the world - it can happen if we attach enough importance, respect and money to the movement for Safety-Respect-Prosperity.

Sound far-fetched? Are you one of the hordes of people who shelled out big bucks and lined up at the box office to watch An Inconvenient Truth?

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